Dealing with Fear in Training

Dealing with Fear in Training

Christine Moonbeam and I have been working into front tuck recently. Release skills are so fun and kinda scary. Thanks Sean Kirkpatrick for really good spotting. It’s awesome to feel safe and to be able to actually feel the skill happening.

Acro always involves risk, and training smart greatly reduces how much risk you take. Fear can be paralyzing (my first time basing chair in 2008: get off get off I’m gonna DROP you!) at any level of difficulty, and it should be taken into account as much as skill, strength, fatigue levels, etc. Bases, flyers, and spotters should feel safe looking for confidence or fear and speaking to that as much as technique. It’s OK to be scared. Nerves are normal and can keep you attentive and safe, but intense fear makes optimal movement difficult or even impossible. Intense fear should be addressed with a break, repeating similar but more accessible skills, or doing solo strength and/or agility work to make the movement familiar with more ease and fewer variables.

A few simple but effective tools that everyone doing acro and working up to a new skill (base/fly/spot) should be able to ask and answer honestly and without ego are:
• Do you feel confident with this skill?
• Would you like to repeat the prep?
• Are we ready (as a partnership) to attempt?
• Have you spotted this skill before?
• Would you like to prep the spot?

Answers to these questions should be based on immediate experience (today) rather than previous experience (the jam 2 weeks ago… )

Christine and I do several sets of straight throws to warm up, until we both feel ready. Christine already has a good front tuck, and we spot her on the ground several times. Flyers should have a solid front tuck on a trampoline and enough experience to be able to make nuanced adjustments before attempting, as landing on a base is different than landing on the ground.

That’s our process for learning new skills and navigating the fear response that can come up. If you feel called I’d love to hear how you deal with fear in training on our social media channels!

 

View this post on Instagram

@christinemoonbeam and I have been working into front tuck recently. Release skills are so fun and kinda scary. Thanks @seanacrobase for really good spotting. It's awesome to feel safe and to be able to actually feel the skill happening. Acro always involves risk, and training smart greatly reduces how much risk you take. Fear can be paralyzing (my first time basing chair in 2008: get off get off I'm gonna DROP you!) at any level of difficulty, and it should be taken into account as much as skill, strength, fatigue levels, etc. Bases, flyers, and spotters should feel safe looking for confidence or fear and speaking to that as much as technique. It's OK to be scared. Nerves are normal and can keep you attentive and safe, but intense fear makes optimal movement difficult or even impossible. Intense fear should be addressed with a break, repeating similar but more accessible skills, or doing solo strength and/or agility work to make the movement familiar with more ease and fewer variables. A few simple but effective tools that everyone doing acro and working up to a new skill (base/fly/spot) should be able to ask and answer honestly and without ego are: • Do you feel confident with this skill? • Would you like to repeat the prep? • Are we ready (as a partnership) to attempt? • Have you spotted this skill before? • Would you like to prep the spot? Answers to these questions should be based on immediate experience (today) rather than previous experience (the jam 2 weeks ago… ) @christinemoonbeam and I do several sets of straight throws to warm up, until we both feel ready. Christine already has a good front tuck, and we spot her on the ground several times. I think flyers should have a solid front tuck on a trampoline and enough experience to be able to make nuanced adjustments before attempting, as landing on a base is different than landing on the ground. That's our process for learning new skills and navigating the fear response that can come up. If you feel called I'd love to hear how you deal with fear in training! 🎪 LIFT Fundamentals Immersion Denver 2018 12/8-12 🎪 AcroLove New Years 2018-19 12/29-31 (discount code: aaron10)

A post shared by Aaron Lift (@aaronlindacro) on

No Comments

Post A Comment